community watershed restoration since 1983

Fire and Fuels Training Opportunity through the Karuk Department of Natural Resources

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are thrilled to share this incredible opportunity for folks interested in learning more about fire and fuels management. The Karuk Tribe invites all tribes, interested members of the public, and non-governmental organizations in the North Coast region to participate in ONLINE AND FIELD training as part of the Tribe’s Regional Forest & Fire Capacity demonstration project, “Burning Across Boundaries”. This project is intended to support collaborative planning that can enable tribes and partners throughout the North Coast region to work together in utilizing prescribed fire as a tool for achieving long term forest and ecosystem health. For more information email dnrtraining@karuk.us.

Click here to download the full schedule with course descriptions.

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Deadline to Join the Board of Directors: January 30th!

We are currently accepting nominations for our Board of Directors. If you or someone you know is interested in running for the Board, email vroom@mattole.org before our annual meeting on January 30. Membership will vote on new Board members in early February.

Anyone with a vested interest in the health of our community and local ecosystems is eligible for a nomination. Only current MRC members can nominate or vote for a Director – so make sure your membership is up to date.

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Giving Tuesday!

The MRC has been advocating and working to restore natural systems in the Mattole Watershed since 1983. That’s 37 years of serving our community and our watershed. 

This year has simultaneously challenged us and encouraged us to support each other more than ever. While the negativities of the year threaten to bring us down, the beauty in our communities, families, and ecosystem have framed our scene with a brilliant and shining resiliency. Just like the mighty Mattole, this year is a reminder that we too are sure to persevere and thrive in the face of adversity.

If you’d like to consider donating to the MRC in honor of Giving Tuesday, you can do so on our website here or via a check sent to PO Box 160 in Petrolia. For other ways to be involved, email Sarah Vroom at vroom@mattole.org or drop us a line at (707)629-3514. Thank you!

Giving Tuesday is a global generosity movement unleashing the power of people and organizations to transform their communities and the world. Giving  Tuesday was created in 2012 as a simple idea: a day that encourages people to do good. Over the past eight years, it has grown into a global movement that inspires hundreds of millions of people to give, collaborate, and celebrate generosity.

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Sudden Oak Death in the Mattole Watershed

You are invited to attend a free virtual meeting with Yana Valachovic (University of California Cooperative Extension) about sudden oak death (SOD) in the Mattole watershed. The meeting is at 6:30 pm on November 19th, 2020.

The MRC has been tracking the spread of this water mold and contributing our findings to the California state database. Get an update on where it is currently in the Mattole watershed. Learn about SOD basics like what is it, how does it spread, and what are the current best management practices to slow its spread. What should you do if you have SOD on your property or see evidence of it on public land? And perhaps most importantly: Can people, groups, and agencies work together to manage the impacts and fire risks?

TO JOIN: Please click on the website link below to register for this Zoom event. Soon after registration, you will receive an email with a link to join the meeting on November 19th.

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Postponed: Cutcha Risling Baldy Workshop

This was originally scheduled to be at the end of October and the beginning of November but has been postponed until further notice. We apologize for any inconvenience. We know people were really excited about the workshop. You can find more information about HSU’s Native American Studies Department and Cutcha Risling Baldy’s work at their YouTube channel here.

We would also like to highlight the important work of the InterTribal Sinkyone Wilderness Council whose traditional territory extends into what we call the Mattole Watershed. You can learn more from their website here.

Humboldt Histories: Indigenous Peoples & Environmentalism in Humboldt County

Mattole Restoration Council, Mattole Salmon Group and Sanctuary Forest are hosting a series of zoom presentations as part of our effort to better understand and work with Indigenous communities in our area. These free presentations will be open to the public, and we invite you all to join us as we continue to learn and grow from each other. The sessions, listed below, will be led by Cutcha Risling Baldy, Associate Professor and Department Chair of Native American Studies at Humboldt State University.

Check out this video on by Sanctuary Forest on the Van Arken Creek.

 

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Join a discussion about Sudden Oak Death in the Mattole Watershed

You are invited to attend a free virtual meeting with Yana Valachovic (University of California Cooperative Extension) about sudden oak death (SOD) in the Mattole watershed. The meeting is at 6:30 pm on November 19th, 2020.

The MRC has been tracking the spread of this water mold and contributing our findings to the California state database. Get an update on where it is currently in the Mattole watershed. Learn about SOD basics like what is it, how does it spread, and what are the current best management practices to slow its spread. What should you do if you have SOD on your property or see evidence of it on public land? And perhaps most importantly: Can people, groups, and agencies work together to manage the impacts and fire risks?

TO JOIN, click on the following link: http://ucanr.edu/sod2020

You can also find this information and more on our events page.

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How to Poop on the Beach

Mattole area beaches including the Lost Coast have seen increased visitation in the summer and fall of 2020. It is a blessing to have these wild, wide open spaces to explore during the COVID pandemic and when other areas are severely impacted by wildfires, and local beaches are a great place to recreate safely. However, improper disposal of human waste is unsightly, unsanitary, and causes environmental damage to these precious areas. Please do your part to dispose of human waste properly, and help keep the beaches and dunes pristine

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