community watershed restoration since 1983

Medicinal Herbs MFI Course

On April 1, Mattole Field Institute ran a well-attended, free field course on Medicinal Herbs with a local herbalist Nicole Gagliano of Wild and Wise Herbal CSA. Twenty-three community members came out for the instructional hike, which was noteworthy due to another popular event being subsequently scheduled on the same day. One delightful outcome of this field course was that it was attended by young and old: participants ranged from 6 years old to elders in their 70s. We learned to identify various medicinal plants growing along roadsides and in the forest of lower Mill Creek, and then had a focused classroom session where we discussed medicinal properties of the plants, with a hands-on session of medicine-making. Participants who stayed

for the latter portion took home medicinal tinctures and salves that they had prepared themselves, as well as a guide to herbal medicine-making prepared by Nicole.

Thank you Nicole and everyone that attended! And, thank you the Grace US Foundation for making this course possible!

To learn more about Nicole’s herbal CSA, Wild and Wise, visit wildandwisecsa.com.

For additional upcoming courses, click here.

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MFI Short Courses, Free and Open to the Public!

Thanks to the generous support of Grace US Foundation, the Mattole Field Institute is excited to offer a series of 1-day courses that are free and open to the public! However, space is limited – so please RSVP with flora@mattole.org if you are interested in attending any of these great classes.

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Nick’s Interns – Application Process Open!

High school students! The application process for Nick’s Interns is now open. Spend 3 weeks this summer working with either the King Range BLM in Whitethorn, or the MRC in Petrolia. Not only will you be learning great new skills, but these are paid positions that will look great on your resume and college applications. More info and application here: http://www.mattole.org/programs/education/nicks-interns/

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Van Auken Timber Harvest Plan

The MRC is reviewing the Van Auken/Arken Timber Harvest Plan (THP) 1-16-081HUM through the public comment process. This is a big plan, especially considering the type of activities that are proposed. The forests are barely beginning to recover with trees averaging 55-70 years old. The landowner, Boyle (Barnum), has proposed harvesting over 500 acres that will pockmark the landscape in tributary watersheds in the Mattole headwaters with some units in the Eel River watershed. There are 36 units total, with almost 200 ac

Photo Credit: Galen Doherty, Sanctuary Forest

Photo Credit: Galen Doherty, Sanctuary Forest

res being clearcut and another 100 being rehabilitated. This will mean almost 300 acres of cleared ground when operations are completed. The entire plan will use tractors or ground-based equipment to remove logs with an option to use cable yarding. Other flags include multiple stream crossings, some steep slopes, and the use of herbicides.

The MRC urges the public to comment on this plan. The process is still open for public comment as of March 2017. Check back here for updates. To understand the public comment process, go to the CAL FIRE website here:

http://calfire.ca.gov/resource_mgt/resource_mgt_forestpractice_thpreviewprocess

It is particularly important to understand the plan through the eyes of the Pre-Harvest Inspection reports. To view the contents of the plan and any reports filed go here:

ftp://thp.fire.ca.gov/THPLibrary/North_Coast_Region/THPs/THPs2016/1-16-081HUM/

Several of the tributaries: Van Arken, McKee and Ravashoni are part of a campaign by Sanctuary Forest to purchase the property for conservation. The forests and the entire Van Arken tributary would be protected into the future nurturing salmon, amphibians, and forest creatures for all of us. MRC cannot stress enough the importance of this project to our watershed. For more information, please go here:

http://www.sanctuaryforest.org/savevanarken/

To download a sample letter, click this  attachment sample-comment-letter-vanarken

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2016 Coastal Cleanup-A Success!

dsc_0479_groupw_unityThe morning sun rose over the golden hills of the Mattole Valley promising a beautiful day for the annual California Coastal Cleanup.

On Friday, September 16, the Mattole Restoration Council (MRC) teamed up with the Mattole and Honeydew schools to participate in the largest volunteer event in the state of California. This event was the 3rd consecutive year that the MRC has combined forces with the local schools to participate in the cleanup and, once again, it proved to be a success. With almost 60 volunteers, students and adults paired into teams to scour the beaches near McNutt Gulch and collected over 176 pounds of trash! Some particularly interesting items were discovered including a crab trap, some metal sheet roofing and some large plastic objects with Japanese writing on them.

The 2015 California Coastal Cleanup efforts resulted in the collection of 1,142,977 pounds of trash from beaches all over the state and in Humboldt County a total of 13,435 pounds of marine debris were removed from our local beaches. Keeping our beaches clean is not only important to preserve the natural beauty of our coastline but is also vital to prevent harm to marine wildlife. These animals (and even people!) can be harmed and sometimes killed by marine debris in various ways including entanglement, ingestion and the disruption of their natural habitat. Every piece of trash that is collected and removed from our beaches can potentially save an animal’s life. So hats off to each and every volunteer that participated in this year’s Coastal Cleanup and we look forward to seeing you out there again next year!

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Helicopter arrives to help fish

From my office window I’m watching the massive, double blade helicopter ‘Chinook’ land in the staging field. Over the next two days, local crews led by the Mattole Salmon Group, in partnership with BLM, will oversee the placement of 200 whole, intact large trees in the Mattole Estuary.  These trees will provide much needed habitat for fish, and will be added to the 200 trees that were placed in 2013. The trees come from the adjacent hillside, and are donated by the landowner to reduce Douglas fir encroachment of his grazing area- which means this is also helping to reclaim grasslands. Why a helicopter? This helicopter can carry an entire tree- root wad, branches, and trunk- unlike other heavy equipment. This whole tree provides the complexity that fish need, and helps the tree stay lodged in the Estuary for longer than a simple log. This means almost no hardware to anchor it, no large boulders trucked into the Mattole, and no need for extensive logging roads to access the trees. Also, helicopters can place a tree in a matter of minutes– which means that more wood is placed in a matter of days that we’ve had placed in decades of work.

For more about this and all the other work being done in the Estuary, see http://www.mattolesalmon.org/programs/habitat/restoration/estuary/ and information on the last round of heli-wood: http://www.mattole.org/news/mattole-river-estuary-project-update/.

If you are local, you can watch the helicopter while enjoying hot dogs and hamburgers at the viewing point on Lighthouse Road today (Monday Sept 19), and Prosper Ridge tomorrow (Tuesday Sept 20) from 11am-2pm.

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Win a Year’s Supply of Gold Rush Coffee!

What does coffee have to do with native plants? The Mattole Restoration Council and Gold Rush Coffee are partnering to bring you the opportunity to support your local native plant nursery AND win delicious, locally roasted coffee.

 

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Tickets



 

Win 3 lbs Gold Rush coffee per month for 12 months ~$400 value
Available for local pick-up, or shipped to you monthly

How: Buy tickets online here or come by our Petrolia office

When: Drawing will be held at the MRC Hoophouse Hoedown at our new nursery site on July 9th
*You don’t need to be present to win

All proceeds will support the Mattole Restoration Council’s new, larger capacity native plant nursery

Gold Rush Coffee is a local, family business roasting premium coffees from around the world. Our small-batch roasting process ensures freshness, while 25 years of experience enhances each blend. We think our coffees are among the best available.IMG_8570

The Mattole Restoration Council is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization, FID 68-0037149.

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Help us build our new Native Plant Nursery

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We have outgrown our current location and are moving our native plant nursery. Our new facility will be operational in April, 2016. The new nursery will be located on Chambers road just past the school. Currently we grow about 50,000 native grasses, shrubs, and trees. With our new facilities we will be able to grow up to 200,000 native plants. Our new facility will have two greenhouses, an expanded parking area, a shade structure, outdoor work space, and an expanded native plant demonstration garden.IMG_0745

We have broken ground on our new site! We still have a lot of work ahead of us and there are a variety of different ways you can become involved and help us make this transition.

How to Support Us

There are several upcoming events in which you can help.

March 25th AND 27th The Great Nursery Migration Volunteer Events! We will meet at the Mattole Valley Community Center at noon on Friday, 3/25 and at 10am on Sunday, 3/27. Come be a part of a big change at the Mattole Restoration Council. Click here for more details.

July 9th Hoop House Hoedown! We will have a barbecue, music, dancing, and more. There is also a raffle with the opportunity to win great prizes. Click here for more details.

 

We are trying to raise $40,000 for nursery move and upgrades. We need your help.

Click here to support us

$50 will help us buy nursery propagation benches

$100 will help us buy greenhouse plastic and greenhouse building materials

$500 will help us buy lumber, water tanks, building materials

$1,000 will help us buy a solar system

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